Building a shop

If it has an electrical cord it is covered here.
John Whitley
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Re: Building a shop

Tue Jan 16, 2018 8:03 pm

Chris Hall wrote:
Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:31 am
Well, I prefer a fence which doesn't move when you push on it [...]
Thanks Chris, all good food for thought.
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Brian
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Re: Building a shop

Thu Jan 18, 2018 9:36 am

I’m convinced the same. Sam at scmi sent me a video they are using to promote their tools. The fellow removed or never installed guard or fence in the jointer.

My understanding of euro technique is that a board is prepped by face jointing, followed by straight line rip using the sliding saw outrigger. Rip to width on a bandsaw. Then thickness plane and turn the board up on edge to make a uniform width.

I edge joint since I don’t have a slider.
John Whitley
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Re: Building a shop

Fri Jan 26, 2018 1:50 pm

I'm really looking forward to giving the slider a go for my modular takadai builds. It may be a significant win when it comes to prepping over-dimension stock. I'm going to experiment with face jointing, then ripping the posts and rails (both of square cross-section) to width and thickness on the slider.

Over on another thread, Brian writes:
Brian wrote:
Tue Jan 23, 2018 10:11 am
This is always the result when I attempt to be thrifty and act on a ‘good deal’.
I'm a touch leery of this same effect, but so far so good. The slider has cleaned up well and I'm in the process of upgrading the fairly questionable stock rip fence. My main red flag is a bent leadscrew for blade angle adjustment. Angle adjustment still moves smoothly, but I haven't set about determining if the movement of the bent leadscrew is causing misalignment problems, e.g. with the blade correctly aligned at 0 degrees, does it skew off at other angles? I'll give credit to Grizzly, though: their documentation and website ordering support for replacement parts is spectacular. No other woodworking manufacturer comes close, AFAICT. I don't love the idea of having to pull the saw apart to replace that screw, but if I need to, it's trivial to identify and order the correct part.
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Brian
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Re: Building a shop

Fri Jan 26, 2018 11:54 pm

Interesting, I would think that it would be best to plane to width after straight lining one side, but I'm a noob in this department so not sure if that is the best procedure.

It's good that they're replacing it, I would imagine it would cause issues. I find anything slightly out caused a headache at some point.
John Whitley
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Re: Building a shop

Tue Jan 30, 2018 9:41 pm

A little more of Brian's 'good deal' syndrome surfaced today: the tensioning arm for the scoring blade belt was bent. The prior owners had been running the saw without a scoring blade, which wasn't remarkable in and of itself. From what I gathered, the saw did the majority of its work sizing MDF for a big CNC router setup. But with the belt also taken off, the tensioning arm hits the side of the cabinet, and bangs around against the cabinet reinforcement members whenever the blade is tilted. Best guess: the arm was damaged over time as the blade was taken over to 45° periodically. Or maybe someone just forced it hard once.

Thus far, it's all relatively inexpensive and easy to fix "fun and games". These tune ups aren't blocking my use of the saw or shop, since I'm still working on getting power and dust collection sorted out. I'll chalk this up as good experience familiarizing myself with the guts of this table saw (or any table saw, for that matter).
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Brian
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Re: Building a shop

Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:59 am

Ah, sorry to hear but sometimes it is satisfying to find and fix a problem.

In the same vein; I finally had to take apart, totally the tailstock of my lathe. What I thought might have been ok, was not. There is a small pin that keeps a brass threaded sleeve inserted into a steel tube. Someone wrenched on the tailstock adjustment with the lock set. This galled the side and actually sheared the pin keeping the brass bit in place. When I fixed the first mess I thought the insert was OK, I tightened up the pin and thought it would retain itself....nope. I ended up taking it apart and silver soldering the brass nut to the tube.

One cool thing I discovered however was that all of the scratches and so forth to the machine's finish...or many of them I should say were simply grease or coffee stains literally sat on there for so long that they became hardened and I assumed they were damage to the finish. A bit of cooktop magic and about 3 hours of 'wax-on, wax-off' and the machine actually looks reasonably good (save for the ugly yellow paint).
John Whitley
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Location: Seattle, WA
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Re: Building a shop

Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:41 pm

Some progress today: the bent leadscrew has been replaced, with a relative minimum of fuss due to some good advice re: the disassembly approach from Grizzly technical customer service.

And now for an averted scare: With the leadscrew replaced, I set about getting the 90 & 45 degree stop nuts recalibrated. At one point I realize that I’m not reading 90 deg the same depending on what angle my machnist’s square is set on the cast iron surface. My first thought is that maybe my square was dropped at some point, but a second square showed exactly the same behavior. Then it dawns on me: the cast iron isn’t level. I grab my machinist’s straightedge and some feeler gauges. Well, the gauges were moot. The surface was so bowed that If I held the straightedge down on the leading edge of the table, it was a good 1/8” above the trailing edge. [Elide about 30 minutes of low-grade freaking out.] Finally, after talking it out, I realize the problem may be in the mounting, not the table itself. Fortunately, that was correct. After loosening the bolts holding the table to the cabinet, I was unable to get a .0015” feeler gauge anywhere under my straightedge at multiple angles. :D

More mysteriously, the cabinet and table have a clear provision for leveling: holes and support points for leveling screws, one next to each table bolt. But those screws are all missing. There’s some signs these were present at one point, so perhaps a former owner removed them and never replaced them? sigh.
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Chris Hall
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Re: Building a shop

Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:40 am

I take it you bought a used machine? Care to share any pics?
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Brian
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Re: Building a shop

Fri Feb 09, 2018 10:48 am

Nice work John!
John Whitley
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Location: Seattle, WA
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Re: Building a shop

Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:10 pm

Happy to post photos, but don’t have a lot that’s super interesting yet. The saw is still lying about largely disassembled as I’ve been doing work on it, waiting for replacement parts, etc.

Cabinet:
Image

Slider and outrigger parts:
Image

Manufacturer’s page, where the photos are currently rather more evocative.

I also acquired 400mm of a heavy-duty angle extrusion from Misumi US for use in the new rip fence. I’ll post more about that project later once I’ve gotten some photos of it.

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